Meadow Clary

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 I’ve been painting a series of wild flower paintings.  When we lived in France I used to paint landscapes and flowers.  The pictures here were taken early one morning in the fields around our house there.  I wanted to do studies of Meadow Clary. It is a very common flower in this part of France,  coming out to decorate the fields after the hay has been cut.  In Wales I understand it is extinct and due to the intensity of the way we farm only exists in a handful of places in the rest of the country. It is a lovely colour and reminds me of the end of late summer and the rentrée, a time when life quietens after the summer visitors have left, and there is subdued dread and excitement about the new school year after the long holidays.

As usual you look for one thing and find another.

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In this case a flower sometimes called Bishops’s Lace, or Wild Carrot (Daucus Carrota).

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But we did find Meadow Clary

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Meadow Clary’s latin name is Salvia Pratensis. Salvia comes from the word for health salus, and meadow clary was used as an eye bath, the name derived from clear eye, and also as a gargle for sore throats.

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21st September to 12th October the Elspeth Montcrieff-Bray Gallery is showing my flower paintings alongside works by Victoria Threlfall, Annie Field, Tuema Pattie, Stephen Palmer, Lucy Powell, Sarah Warly Cummings, Sandra Whitmore, Hannah MacAndrew, Ostinelli and Priest, Diana Tonnison, Diana Baraclough, and Adam Binder

Private View 3 p.m. to 8 p.m, 21st September.

Opening Times 11 a.m. to 4 p.m and after 12th October by appointment.

Moncrieff-Bray Gallery, Woodruffs Farm, Woodruffs Lane, Egdean, Petworth, West Sussex RH20 1JX

07867 978 414   mail@moncrieff-bray.com

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3 thoughts on “Meadow Clary

  1. Seeing the name “clary” I wondered if this were another name for Clary Sage which is used in aromatherapy. It isn’t QUITE the same plant but it belongs to the same family. Clary Sage can be wonderfully relaxing. . . definitely not to be used just before operating machinery.

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